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Phone: +61 426 265 492

Email:  jibbijug@gmail.com

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All transactions will be carried out in USD Currency,  @ 2016 JIBBIJUG MILK PITCHER COPYRIGHT

150g / bag

Country: Ethiopia
Region: Bench Maji
Varieties: Gesha 1931, Gori Gesha
Source: Gaylee
Altitude: 1900 - 2100 masl.
Processes: Natural


Flavor Profile Summary:
Delicate floral lime aroma; sweet and fruity Punch flavor, rich taste attributes.

Flavor Attributes Noted by Cuppers:
Bergamot, Caramel, Clean, Floral, Fruit, Delicate Jasmin, Lime, Apricot

Average Cupping Score: 89 and above

Gesha Village

$30.00Price
    • Country
      Bolivia
    • Province
      Caranavi
    • Colony
      Bolinda
    • Altitude
      1,600-1,650m above sea level
    • Variety
      Geisha
    • Processing
      Washed
    • Owner
      Pedro Rodriguez
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    In 2012, Pedro Rodriguez responded by planting his own farms to guarantee supply and the future sustainability of his business, and to demonstrate to local farmers what can be achieved with the application of modern farming techniques and a scientific approach. Under this project, called ‘Fincas Los Rodriguez’, Agricafe now has 12 farms, and aims to plant around 200 hectares of coffee in total across them

     

     

    The farm boasts a very vibrant and flourishing nursery at its centre that contains tens of thousands of plants

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    Alasitas was planted in 2014, and is 20 hectares in size, 16 of which are under coffee. The farm sits at about 1,600-1,650 metres above sea level. This high altitude helps to ensure a slow maturation of the cherry because of the stable night-time temperature and mild day temperatures. The slow maturation leads to an increased concentration of sugars in the cherry and bean, which in turns helps to produce a sweeter cup of coffee.

    Pedro and his family have invested a lot of time and effort into trying to make this a ‘model’ farm that other producers in the area can learn from. The coffee is meticulously organised by variety and is well spaced in neat rows, making picking much easier to manage than on the more traditional farms in the region. Pedro has trialled several varieties on this farm, including Geisha (planted at the highest parts of the farm), Java, and Red Caturra. The farm boasts a very vibrant and flourishing nursery at its centre that contains tens of thousands of plants.

    HOW THIS COFFEE WAS PROCESSED

    This very special lot was hand picked and processed on the same day at the Rodriguez family’s Buena Vista Mill. It was pulped and then fermented in water for 40 hours. During the 40 hours the water was changed every 8-10 hours with cold water. The coffee was then slowly dried in stationary dryers for 71 hours and then finished off in the green house. The greenhouse has adjustable walls that can be raised to allow maximum ventilation, and the shade provides protection against the sun and ensures that the parchment does not break, allowing the coffee to finish drying slowly. While drying, the coffee was turned regularly to ensure it dried evenly, and carefully inspected for any defects.

     

    The team of pickers have been trained to pick only the very ripest cherries to ensure the best possible quality cup.

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    Once the coffee was dry, it was transported to La Paz where it was rested, and then milled at the Rodriguez family’s brand new dry mill. There, the coffee was carefully screened again by machines and also by hand.

    WHATS IN A NAME?

    Alasitas means “Buy Me” in the local Aymara native language. The name comes from a festival called Alasitas, which is a festival of desires and honours the Andean god of abundance.

    Starting at noon on the 24th of January every year (which also happens to be Pedro Pablo’s birthday!) Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, comes alive with a sense of promise, wishfulness and whimsy. The scene may seem strange to someone unfamiliar with this cultural event that has its roots in pre-Colombian Aymara traditions and has evolved over the centuries to incorporate elements of Catholicism and Western consumerism, but to locals, Alasitas is an important fixture in their calendar.

    During the festival, thousands flock to La Paz to buy miniature items – cars, hours, university degrees, suitcases full of cash, potential spouses – of everything they want in the coming year. It can be something material, or something that brings luck – like a chicken that will help you find love, or a frog that will bring you good fortune. All miniatures are blessed by a Yatiri (a spiritual leader in Aymara culture) and offered to the Ekeko, the Andean god of abundance.  Minitures are exchanged with family and friends, in a hope that their dreams will be realised, and in turn, you will also be blessed with abundance.

    Reciprocity is at the heart of the Alasitas festivals and it is for this reason that it is a fitting name for the farm. The Alasitas farm is one of the largest the Rodriguez’s own in Caranavi and was created with the vision of becoming a model farm local coffee growers could learn from, and be inspired by, thus helping them realise the vast potential of their land and crops.

     

    Alasitas was planted in 2014, and is 20 hectares in size, 16 of which are under coffee. The farm sits at about 1,600-1,650 metres above sea level. This high altitude helps to ensure a slow maturation of the cherry because of the stable night-time temperature and mild day temperatures. The slow maturation leads to an increased concentration of sugars in the cherry and bean, which in turns helps to produce a sweeter cup of coffee.

    Pedro and his family have invested a lot of time and effort into trying to make this a ‘model’ farm that other producers in the area can learn from. The coffee is meticulously organised by variety and is well spaced in neat rows, making picking much easier to manage than on the more traditional farms in the region. Pedro has trialled several varieties on this farm, including Geisha (planted at the highest parts of the farm), Java, and Red Caturra. The farm boasts a very vibrant and flourishing nursery at its centre that contains tens of thousands of plants.

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